Bachelor's degree

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university type - Poland  
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Wrocław, Poland

Translation, Interpretation

Translatoryka

Bachelor's
Field of studies: Philology
Language: PolishStudies in Polish
Subject area: languages
Kind of studies: full-time studies, part-time studies
University website: www.wsb.pl/english
  • Description:

  • pl
Interpretation
Interpretation or interpreter may refer to:
Translation
Translation is the communication of the meaning of a source-language text by means of an equivalent target-language text. The English language draws a terminological distinction (not all languages do) between translating (a written text) and interpreting (oral or sign-language communication between users of different languages); under this distinction, translation can begin only after the appearance of writing within a language community.
Translation
No man is capable of translating poetry, who, besides a genius to that art, is not a master both of his author's language and of his own; nor must we understand the language only of the poet, but his particular turn of thoughts and expression, which are the characters that distinguish, and as it were individuate him from all other writers. When we are come thus far it is time to look into ourselves, to conform our genius to his, to give his thought either the same turn, if our tongue will bear it, or, if not, to vary but the dress, not to alter or destroy the substance.
John Dryden, Preface to Ovid's Epistles (1680).
Translation
Hence the vanity of translation; it were as wise to cast a violet into a crucible that you might discover the formal principle of its colour and odour, as seek to transfuse from one language into another the creations of a poet. The plant must spring again from its seed, or it will bear no flower—and this is the burthen of the curse of Babel.
Percy Bysshe Shelley, A Defence of Poetry (1821)
Translation
You've often heard me say – perhaps too often – that poetry is what is lost in translation. It is also what is lost in interpretation. That little poem means just what it says and it says what it means, nothing less but nothing more.
Robert Frost, A Backward Look, by Louis Untermeyer (1964), p. 18.
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